Tampere University of Technology

TUTCRIS Research Portal

Intuitiveness of vibrotactile speed regulation cues

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Standard

Intuitiveness of vibrotactile speed regulation cues. / Lylykangas, Jani; Surakka, Veikko; Rantala, Jussi; Raisamo, Roope.

In: ACM TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED PERCEPTION, Vol. 10, No. 4, 24, 10.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Harvard

Lylykangas, J, Surakka, V, Rantala, J & Raisamo, R 2013, 'Intuitiveness of vibrotactile speed regulation cues', ACM TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED PERCEPTION, vol. 10, no. 4, 24. https://doi.org/10.1145/2536764.2536771

APA

Lylykangas, J., Surakka, V., Rantala, J., & Raisamo, R. (2013). Intuitiveness of vibrotactile speed regulation cues. ACM TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED PERCEPTION, 10(4), [24]. https://doi.org/10.1145/2536764.2536771

Vancouver

Lylykangas J, Surakka V, Rantala J, Raisamo R. Intuitiveness of vibrotactile speed regulation cues. ACM TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED PERCEPTION. 2013 Oct;10(4). 24. https://doi.org/10.1145/2536764.2536771

Author

Lylykangas, Jani ; Surakka, Veikko ; Rantala, Jussi ; Raisamo, Roope. / Intuitiveness of vibrotactile speed regulation cues. In: ACM TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED PERCEPTION. 2013 ; Vol. 10, No. 4.

Bibtex - Download

@article{09fbdae709854c16b285ebf4f1c58213,
title = "Intuitiveness of vibrotactile speed regulation cues",
abstract = "Interpretations of vibrotactile stimulations were compared between two participant groups. In both groups, the task was to evaluate specifically designed tactile stimulations presented to the wrist or chest. Ascending, constant, and descending vibration frequency profiles of the stimuli represented information for three different speed regulation instructions: {"}accelerate your speed,{"} {"}keep your speed constant,{"} and {"}decelerate your speed,{"} respectively. The participants were treated differently so that one of the groups was first taught (i.e., primed) the meanings of the stimuli, whereas the other group was not taught (i.e., unprimed). The results showed that the stimuli were evaluated nearly equally in the primed and the unprimed groups. The best performing stimuli communicated the three intended meanings in the rate of 88{\%} to 100{\%} in the primed group and in the unprimed group in the rate of 71{\%} to 83{\%}. Both groups performed equally in evaluating {"}keep your speed constant{"} and {"}decelerate your speed{"} information. As the unprimed participants performed similarly to the primed participants, the results suggest that vibrotactile stimulation can be intuitively understood. The results suggest further that carefully designed vibrotactile stimulations could be functional in delivering easy-to-understand feedback on how to regulate the speed of movement, such as in physical exercise and rehabilitation applications.",
keywords = "Haptic feedback, Heart rate monitor, Human-computer interaction, Iconic information, Intuitive decision making, Priming",
author = "Jani Lylykangas and Veikko Surakka and Jussi Rantala and Roope Raisamo",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1145/2536764.2536771",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "ACM TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED PERCEPTION",
issn = "1544-3558",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intuitiveness of vibrotactile speed regulation cues

AU - Lylykangas, Jani

AU - Surakka, Veikko

AU - Rantala, Jussi

AU - Raisamo, Roope

PY - 2013/10

Y1 - 2013/10

N2 - Interpretations of vibrotactile stimulations were compared between two participant groups. In both groups, the task was to evaluate specifically designed tactile stimulations presented to the wrist or chest. Ascending, constant, and descending vibration frequency profiles of the stimuli represented information for three different speed regulation instructions: "accelerate your speed," "keep your speed constant," and "decelerate your speed," respectively. The participants were treated differently so that one of the groups was first taught (i.e., primed) the meanings of the stimuli, whereas the other group was not taught (i.e., unprimed). The results showed that the stimuli were evaluated nearly equally in the primed and the unprimed groups. The best performing stimuli communicated the three intended meanings in the rate of 88% to 100% in the primed group and in the unprimed group in the rate of 71% to 83%. Both groups performed equally in evaluating "keep your speed constant" and "decelerate your speed" information. As the unprimed participants performed similarly to the primed participants, the results suggest that vibrotactile stimulation can be intuitively understood. The results suggest further that carefully designed vibrotactile stimulations could be functional in delivering easy-to-understand feedback on how to regulate the speed of movement, such as in physical exercise and rehabilitation applications.

AB - Interpretations of vibrotactile stimulations were compared between two participant groups. In both groups, the task was to evaluate specifically designed tactile stimulations presented to the wrist or chest. Ascending, constant, and descending vibration frequency profiles of the stimuli represented information for three different speed regulation instructions: "accelerate your speed," "keep your speed constant," and "decelerate your speed," respectively. The participants were treated differently so that one of the groups was first taught (i.e., primed) the meanings of the stimuli, whereas the other group was not taught (i.e., unprimed). The results showed that the stimuli were evaluated nearly equally in the primed and the unprimed groups. The best performing stimuli communicated the three intended meanings in the rate of 88% to 100% in the primed group and in the unprimed group in the rate of 71% to 83%. Both groups performed equally in evaluating "keep your speed constant" and "decelerate your speed" information. As the unprimed participants performed similarly to the primed participants, the results suggest that vibrotactile stimulation can be intuitively understood. The results suggest further that carefully designed vibrotactile stimulations could be functional in delivering easy-to-understand feedback on how to regulate the speed of movement, such as in physical exercise and rehabilitation applications.

KW - Haptic feedback

KW - Heart rate monitor

KW - Human-computer interaction

KW - Iconic information

KW - Intuitive decision making

KW - Priming

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84891757032&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1145/2536764.2536771

DO - 10.1145/2536764.2536771

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - ACM TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED PERCEPTION

JF - ACM TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED PERCEPTION

SN - 1544-3558

IS - 4

M1 - 24

ER -