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Light-Driven, Caterpillar-Inspired Miniature Inching Robot

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Light-Driven, Caterpillar-Inspired Miniature Inching Robot. / Zeng, Hao; Wani, Owies M; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Priimägi, Arri.

In: Macromolecular Rapid Communications, Vol. 39, No. 1, 2017, p. 1700224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Harvard

Zeng, H, Wani, OM, Wasylczyk, P & Priimägi, A 2017, 'Light-Driven, Caterpillar-Inspired Miniature Inching Robot', Macromolecular Rapid Communications, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 1700224. https://doi.org/10.1002/marc.201700224

APA

Zeng, H., Wani, O. M., Wasylczyk, P., & Priimägi, A. (2017). Light-Driven, Caterpillar-Inspired Miniature Inching Robot. Macromolecular Rapid Communications, 39(1), 1700224. https://doi.org/10.1002/marc.201700224

Vancouver

Zeng H, Wani OM, Wasylczyk P, Priimägi A. Light-Driven, Caterpillar-Inspired Miniature Inching Robot. Macromolecular Rapid Communications. 2017;39(1):1700224. https://doi.org/10.1002/marc.201700224

Author

Zeng, Hao ; Wani, Owies M ; Wasylczyk, Piotr ; Priimägi, Arri. / Light-Driven, Caterpillar-Inspired Miniature Inching Robot. In: Macromolecular Rapid Communications. 2017 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 1700224.

Bibtex - Download

@article{64d9c37477ef441786cb34e618d0f0ae,
title = "Light-Driven, Caterpillar-Inspired Miniature Inching Robot",
abstract = "Liquid crystal elastomers are among the best candidates for artificial muscles, and the materials of choice when constructing microscale robotic systems. Recently, significant efforts are dedicated to designing stimuli-responsive actuators that can reproduce the shape-change of soft bodies of animals by means of proper external energy source. However, transferring material deformation efficiently into autonomous robotic locomotion remains a challenge. This paper reports on a miniature inching robot fabricated from a monolithic liquid crystal elastomer film, which upon visible-light excitation is capable of mimicking caterpillar locomotion on different substrates like a blazed grating and a paper surface. The motion is driven by spatially uniform visible light with relatively low intensity, rendering the robot {"}human-friendly,{"} i.e., operational also on human skin. The design paves the way toward light-driven, soft, mobile microdevices capable of operating in various environments, including the close proximity of humans.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Hao Zeng and Wani, {Owies M} and Piotr Wasylczyk and Arri Priim{\"a}gi",
note = "{\circledC} 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1002/marc.201700224",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "1700224",
journal = "Macromolecular Rapid Communications",
issn = "1022-1336",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Light-Driven, Caterpillar-Inspired Miniature Inching Robot

AU - Zeng, Hao

AU - Wani, Owies M

AU - Wasylczyk, Piotr

AU - Priimägi, Arri

N1 - © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Liquid crystal elastomers are among the best candidates for artificial muscles, and the materials of choice when constructing microscale robotic systems. Recently, significant efforts are dedicated to designing stimuli-responsive actuators that can reproduce the shape-change of soft bodies of animals by means of proper external energy source. However, transferring material deformation efficiently into autonomous robotic locomotion remains a challenge. This paper reports on a miniature inching robot fabricated from a monolithic liquid crystal elastomer film, which upon visible-light excitation is capable of mimicking caterpillar locomotion on different substrates like a blazed grating and a paper surface. The motion is driven by spatially uniform visible light with relatively low intensity, rendering the robot "human-friendly," i.e., operational also on human skin. The design paves the way toward light-driven, soft, mobile microdevices capable of operating in various environments, including the close proximity of humans.

AB - Liquid crystal elastomers are among the best candidates for artificial muscles, and the materials of choice when constructing microscale robotic systems. Recently, significant efforts are dedicated to designing stimuli-responsive actuators that can reproduce the shape-change of soft bodies of animals by means of proper external energy source. However, transferring material deformation efficiently into autonomous robotic locomotion remains a challenge. This paper reports on a miniature inching robot fabricated from a monolithic liquid crystal elastomer film, which upon visible-light excitation is capable of mimicking caterpillar locomotion on different substrates like a blazed grating and a paper surface. The motion is driven by spatially uniform visible light with relatively low intensity, rendering the robot "human-friendly," i.e., operational also on human skin. The design paves the way toward light-driven, soft, mobile microdevices capable of operating in various environments, including the close proximity of humans.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1002/marc.201700224

DO - 10.1002/marc.201700224

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 1700224

JO - Macromolecular Rapid Communications

JF - Macromolecular Rapid Communications

SN - 1022-1336

IS - 1

ER -