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Metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased heart rate variability in a sex-dependent manner: a comparison between 252 men and 249 women

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Metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased heart rate variability in a sex-dependent manner : a comparison between 252 men and 249 women. / Kangas, Pauliina; Tikkakoski, Antti; Uitto, Marko; Viik, Jari; Bouquin, Heidi; Niemelä, Onni; Mustonen, Jukka; Pörsti, Ilkka.

In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, Vol. 39, No. 2, 03.2019, p. 160-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Harvard

Kangas, P, Tikkakoski, A, Uitto, M, Viik, J, Bouquin, H, Niemelä, O, Mustonen, J & Pörsti, I 2019, 'Metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased heart rate variability in a sex-dependent manner: a comparison between 252 men and 249 women', Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 160-167. https://doi.org/10.1111/cpf.12551

APA

Kangas, P., Tikkakoski, A., Uitto, M., Viik, J., Bouquin, H., Niemelä, O., ... Pörsti, I. (2019). Metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased heart rate variability in a sex-dependent manner: a comparison between 252 men and 249 women. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, 39(2), 160-167. https://doi.org/10.1111/cpf.12551

Vancouver

Kangas P, Tikkakoski A, Uitto M, Viik J, Bouquin H, Niemelä O et al. Metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased heart rate variability in a sex-dependent manner: a comparison between 252 men and 249 women. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. 2019 Mar;39(2):160-167. https://doi.org/10.1111/cpf.12551

Author

Kangas, Pauliina ; Tikkakoski, Antti ; Uitto, Marko ; Viik, Jari ; Bouquin, Heidi ; Niemelä, Onni ; Mustonen, Jukka ; Pörsti, Ilkka. / Metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased heart rate variability in a sex-dependent manner : a comparison between 252 men and 249 women. In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. 2019 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 160-167.

Bibtex - Download

@article{02af7353a98e431c9c113586ce93067d,
title = "Metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased heart rate variability in a sex-dependent manner: a comparison between 252 men and 249 women",
abstract = "Impaired heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence regarding alterations of HRV in metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains elusive. In order to examine HRV in MetS, we subjected 501 volunteers without atherosclerosis, diabetes or antihypertensive medication, mean age 48 years, to passive head-up tilt. The subjects were divided to control men (n = 131), men with MetS (n = 121), control women (n = 191) and women with MetS (n = 58) according to the criteria by Alberti et al. (Circulation, 2009, 120, 1640). In unadjusted analyses (i) men and women with MetS had lower total power and high-frequency (HF) power of HRV than controls whether supine or upright (P<0·05 for all). (ii) Supine low-frequency (LF) power of HRV was lower in men (P = 0·012) but not in women (P = 0·064) with MetS than in controls, while men and women with MetS had lower upright LF power of HRV than controls (P <0·01 for both). (iii) The LF:HF ratio did not differ between subjects with and without MetS. After adjustment for age, smoking habits, alcohol intake, height, heart rate and breathing frequency, only the differences in upright total power and HF power of HRV between women with MetS and control women remained significant (P<0·05). In conclusion, reduced total and HF power of HRV in the upright position may partially explain why the relative increase in cardiovascular risk associated with MetS is greater in women than in men. Additionally, the present results emphasize that the confounding factors must be carefully taken into consideration when evaluating HRV.",
keywords = "cardiac autonomic tone, cardiovascular risk, head-up tilt, obesity, sex",
author = "Pauliina Kangas and Antti Tikkakoski and Marko Uitto and Jari Viik and Heidi Bouquin and Onni Niemel{\"a} and Jukka Mustonen and Ilkka P{\"o}rsti",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1111/cpf.12551",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "160--167",
journal = "Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging",
issn = "1475-0961",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic syndrome is associated with decreased heart rate variability in a sex-dependent manner

T2 - a comparison between 252 men and 249 women

AU - Kangas, Pauliina

AU - Tikkakoski, Antti

AU - Uitto, Marko

AU - Viik, Jari

AU - Bouquin, Heidi

AU - Niemelä, Onni

AU - Mustonen, Jukka

AU - Pörsti, Ilkka

PY - 2019/3

Y1 - 2019/3

N2 - Impaired heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence regarding alterations of HRV in metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains elusive. In order to examine HRV in MetS, we subjected 501 volunteers without atherosclerosis, diabetes or antihypertensive medication, mean age 48 years, to passive head-up tilt. The subjects were divided to control men (n = 131), men with MetS (n = 121), control women (n = 191) and women with MetS (n = 58) according to the criteria by Alberti et al. (Circulation, 2009, 120, 1640). In unadjusted analyses (i) men and women with MetS had lower total power and high-frequency (HF) power of HRV than controls whether supine or upright (P<0·05 for all). (ii) Supine low-frequency (LF) power of HRV was lower in men (P = 0·012) but not in women (P = 0·064) with MetS than in controls, while men and women with MetS had lower upright LF power of HRV than controls (P <0·01 for both). (iii) The LF:HF ratio did not differ between subjects with and without MetS. After adjustment for age, smoking habits, alcohol intake, height, heart rate and breathing frequency, only the differences in upright total power and HF power of HRV between women with MetS and control women remained significant (P<0·05). In conclusion, reduced total and HF power of HRV in the upright position may partially explain why the relative increase in cardiovascular risk associated with MetS is greater in women than in men. Additionally, the present results emphasize that the confounding factors must be carefully taken into consideration when evaluating HRV.

AB - Impaired heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence regarding alterations of HRV in metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains elusive. In order to examine HRV in MetS, we subjected 501 volunteers without atherosclerosis, diabetes or antihypertensive medication, mean age 48 years, to passive head-up tilt. The subjects were divided to control men (n = 131), men with MetS (n = 121), control women (n = 191) and women with MetS (n = 58) according to the criteria by Alberti et al. (Circulation, 2009, 120, 1640). In unadjusted analyses (i) men and women with MetS had lower total power and high-frequency (HF) power of HRV than controls whether supine or upright (P<0·05 for all). (ii) Supine low-frequency (LF) power of HRV was lower in men (P = 0·012) but not in women (P = 0·064) with MetS than in controls, while men and women with MetS had lower upright LF power of HRV than controls (P <0·01 for both). (iii) The LF:HF ratio did not differ between subjects with and without MetS. After adjustment for age, smoking habits, alcohol intake, height, heart rate and breathing frequency, only the differences in upright total power and HF power of HRV between women with MetS and control women remained significant (P<0·05). In conclusion, reduced total and HF power of HRV in the upright position may partially explain why the relative increase in cardiovascular risk associated with MetS is greater in women than in men. Additionally, the present results emphasize that the confounding factors must be carefully taken into consideration when evaluating HRV.

KW - cardiac autonomic tone

KW - cardiovascular risk

KW - head-up tilt

KW - obesity

KW - sex

U2 - 10.1111/cpf.12551

DO - 10.1111/cpf.12551

M3 - Article

VL - 39

SP - 160

EP - 167

JO - Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging

JF - Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging

SN - 1475-0961

IS - 2

ER -