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SiMPE: 7th Workshop on speech and sound in mobile and pervasive environments

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Details

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMobileHCI'12 - Companion Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services
Pages251-253
Number of pages3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
Event2012 14th ACM International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, MobileHCI'12 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: 21 Sep 201224 Sep 2012

Conference

Conference2012 14th ACM International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, MobileHCI'12
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period21/09/1224/09/12

Abstract

The SiMPE workshop series started in 2006 [2] with the goal of enabling speech processing on mobile and embedded devices to meet the challenges of pervasive environments (such as noise) and leveraging the context they offer (such as location). SiMPE 2010 and 2011 brought together researchers from the speech and the HCI communities. Multimodality got more attention in SiMPE 2008 than it had received in the previous years. In SiMPE 2007, the focus was on developing regions. Speech User interaction in cars was a focus area in 2009. With SiMPE 2012, the 7th in the series, we hope to explore the area of speech along with sound. When using the mobile in an eyes-free manner, it is natural and convenient to hear about notifications and events. The arrival of an SMS has used a very simple sound based notification for a long time now. The technologies underlying speech processing and sound processing are quite different and these communities have been working mostly independent of each other. And yet, for multimodal interactions on the mobile, it is perhaps natural to ask whether and how speech and sound can be mixed and used more effectively and naturally.

Keywords

  • Audio interaction, Mobile computing, Pervasive computing, Sound, Speech processing