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Understanding the digital and non-digital participation by the gaming youth

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Details

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHuman-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2019 - 17th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Proceedings
EditorsDavid Lamas, Fernando Loizides, Lennart Nacke, Helen Petrie, Marco Winckler, Panayiotis Zaphiris
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages453-471
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)9783030293833
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventIFIP TC13 International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Paphos, Cyprus
Duration: 2 Sep 20196 Sep 2019

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
Volume11747
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

ConferenceIFIP TC13 International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
CountryCyprus
CityPaphos
Period2/09/196/09/19

Abstract

It is important for the inclusiveness of society that the youth actively participate in its development. Even though the means of digital participation have advanced in the past decade, there is still lack of understanding of digital participation of the youth. In this paper, we present a study on how youth aged 16–25 years perceive social and societal participation and more specifically, how youth currently participate in non-digitally and digitally. We conducted a mixed method study in a large gaming event in Finland using a questionnaire (N = 277) and face-to-face interviews (N = 25). The findings reveal that the gaming youth consider digital participation to include discussions in different social media services or web discussion forums. Creating digital content (e.g. videos) and answering surveys were also emphasized. Perceived advantages to participate digitally include the freedom regarding location and time, ease and efficiency in sharing information, and inexpensiveness. Central disadvantages include lack of commitment, anonymity, misinformation and cheating. We also found that frequently playing gamers are more likely to participate online in social activities than those who play occasionally. Youth who reported that they play strategy games were more active in civic participation than those who do not play strategy games. We discuss the implications of our findings to the design of tools for digital participation.

Keywords

  • Digital participation, Games, Gaming, Societal participation, Youth

Publication forum classification

Field of science, Statistics Finland