TUTCRIS - Tampereen teknillinen yliopisto

TUTCRIS

Application of Terrestrial LiDAR and Modelling of Tree Branching Structure for Plant-scaling Models in Tropical Forest Trees.

Tutkimustuotos: Konferenssiesitys, posteri tai abstrakti

Standard

Application of Terrestrial LiDAR and Modelling of Tree Branching Structure for Plant-scaling Models in Tropical Forest Trees. / Lau Sarmiento, Alvaro; Bartholomeus, Harm; Herold, Martin; Martius, Christopher; Malhi, Yadvinder; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Shenkin, Alexander; Raumonen, Pasi Antero.

2016. Julkaisun esittämispaikka: Living Planet Symposium 2016, Prague, Tshekki.

Tutkimustuotos: Konferenssiesitys, posteri tai abstrakti

Harvard

Lau Sarmiento, A, Bartholomeus, H, Herold, M, Martius, C, Malhi, Y, Bentley, LP, Shenkin, A & Raumonen, PA 2016, 'Application of Terrestrial LiDAR and Modelling of Tree Branching Structure for Plant-scaling Models in Tropical Forest Trees.' Artikkeli esitetty, Prague, Tshekki, 9/05/16 - 13/05/16, .

APA

Lau Sarmiento, A., Bartholomeus, H., Herold, M., Martius, C., Malhi, Y., Bentley, L. P., ... Raumonen, P. A. (2016). Application of Terrestrial LiDAR and Modelling of Tree Branching Structure for Plant-scaling Models in Tropical Forest Trees.. Julkaisun esittämispaikka: Living Planet Symposium 2016, Prague, Tshekki.

Vancouver

Lau Sarmiento A, Bartholomeus H, Herold M, Martius C, Malhi Y, Bentley LP et al. Application of Terrestrial LiDAR and Modelling of Tree Branching Structure for Plant-scaling Models in Tropical Forest Trees.. 2016. Julkaisun esittämispaikka: Living Planet Symposium 2016, Prague, Tshekki.

Author

Lau Sarmiento, Alvaro ; Bartholomeus, Harm ; Herold, Martin ; Martius, Christopher ; Malhi, Yadvinder ; Bentley, Lisa Patrick ; Shenkin, Alexander ; Raumonen, Pasi Antero. / Application of Terrestrial LiDAR and Modelling of Tree Branching Structure for Plant-scaling Models in Tropical Forest Trees. Julkaisun esittämispaikka: Living Planet Symposium 2016, Prague, Tshekki.

Bibtex - Lataa

@conference{01ea48627dae456fbe5bcdaef4f595a7,
title = "Application of Terrestrial LiDAR and Modelling of Tree Branching Structure for Plant-scaling Models in Tropical Forest Trees.",
abstract = "Terrestrial Laser Scanner has the potential to capture the complex 3D structure, and in combination with 3D tree reconstruction models would allow us to model the shape of the trunk and main branches of trees. This is a step further into a more precise determination of whole-tree architecture and branching patterns; which would lead us into a better understanding of scaling exponents and metabolic rate at branch and whole-tree level in tropical forest trees without the need of destructive sampling. For this study, we extracted three trees from a TLS pointcloud data acquired during November 2013 in the Peruvian amazon rainforest. Quantitative structure model was used to calculate branch length, diameters and architecture from the individual trees. These parameters were used in the WBE plant-scaling model. This model calculated the following exponents: length ratio scaling, radii ratio scaling and estimated metabolic rate scaling and compared to the theoretical values. The theoretical exponent expected from WBE for branch length scaling is 0.3 and for branch radii scaling is 0.5. Across our samples, the calculated branch-level length scaling exponent varied from 0.04 to 0.11 and the calculated branch-level radii scaling exponent ranged from 0.30 to 0.32 (Table 1). The calculated (estimated) metabolic rate scaling exponent was 0.72, 0.71 and 0.76 for Tachigali polyphylla, Jacaranda copaia and Sclerolobium bracteosum (expected to be 0.75 from the WBE model). Estimations of tree scaling metabolism derived from architecture via TLS scans showed consistent and comparable values to the model predictions for all scaling exponents. Since the scanned trees were different species, these results provide evidence to support the WBE assumption of similarities in branching structure and common set of branching rules across trees. To conclude, tree scaling metabolism derived from TLS evidenced that (1) length ratio exponent, radii ratio exponent and architecture estimated metabolic rate converge between the tropical trees analysed, and (2) length ratio exponent, radii ratio exponent and estimated metabolic rate from the analysed samples are comparable with the predicted values.",
author = "{Lau Sarmiento}, Alvaro and Harm Bartholomeus and Martin Herold and Christopher Martius and Yadvinder Malhi and Bentley, {Lisa Patrick} and Alexander Shenkin and Raumonen, {Pasi Antero}",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
language = "English",
note = "Living Planet Symposium 2016 ; Conference date: 09-05-2016 Through 13-05-2016",
url = "http://lps16.esa.int/index.php",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Lataa

TY - CONF

T1 - Application of Terrestrial LiDAR and Modelling of Tree Branching Structure for Plant-scaling Models in Tropical Forest Trees.

AU - Lau Sarmiento, Alvaro

AU - Bartholomeus, Harm

AU - Herold, Martin

AU - Martius, Christopher

AU - Malhi, Yadvinder

AU - Bentley, Lisa Patrick

AU - Shenkin, Alexander

AU - Raumonen, Pasi Antero

PY - 2016/5

Y1 - 2016/5

N2 - Terrestrial Laser Scanner has the potential to capture the complex 3D structure, and in combination with 3D tree reconstruction models would allow us to model the shape of the trunk and main branches of trees. This is a step further into a more precise determination of whole-tree architecture and branching patterns; which would lead us into a better understanding of scaling exponents and metabolic rate at branch and whole-tree level in tropical forest trees without the need of destructive sampling. For this study, we extracted three trees from a TLS pointcloud data acquired during November 2013 in the Peruvian amazon rainforest. Quantitative structure model was used to calculate branch length, diameters and architecture from the individual trees. These parameters were used in the WBE plant-scaling model. This model calculated the following exponents: length ratio scaling, radii ratio scaling and estimated metabolic rate scaling and compared to the theoretical values. The theoretical exponent expected from WBE for branch length scaling is 0.3 and for branch radii scaling is 0.5. Across our samples, the calculated branch-level length scaling exponent varied from 0.04 to 0.11 and the calculated branch-level radii scaling exponent ranged from 0.30 to 0.32 (Table 1). The calculated (estimated) metabolic rate scaling exponent was 0.72, 0.71 and 0.76 for Tachigali polyphylla, Jacaranda copaia and Sclerolobium bracteosum (expected to be 0.75 from the WBE model). Estimations of tree scaling metabolism derived from architecture via TLS scans showed consistent and comparable values to the model predictions for all scaling exponents. Since the scanned trees were different species, these results provide evidence to support the WBE assumption of similarities in branching structure and common set of branching rules across trees. To conclude, tree scaling metabolism derived from TLS evidenced that (1) length ratio exponent, radii ratio exponent and architecture estimated metabolic rate converge between the tropical trees analysed, and (2) length ratio exponent, radii ratio exponent and estimated metabolic rate from the analysed samples are comparable with the predicted values.

AB - Terrestrial Laser Scanner has the potential to capture the complex 3D structure, and in combination with 3D tree reconstruction models would allow us to model the shape of the trunk and main branches of trees. This is a step further into a more precise determination of whole-tree architecture and branching patterns; which would lead us into a better understanding of scaling exponents and metabolic rate at branch and whole-tree level in tropical forest trees without the need of destructive sampling. For this study, we extracted three trees from a TLS pointcloud data acquired during November 2013 in the Peruvian amazon rainforest. Quantitative structure model was used to calculate branch length, diameters and architecture from the individual trees. These parameters were used in the WBE plant-scaling model. This model calculated the following exponents: length ratio scaling, radii ratio scaling and estimated metabolic rate scaling and compared to the theoretical values. The theoretical exponent expected from WBE for branch length scaling is 0.3 and for branch radii scaling is 0.5. Across our samples, the calculated branch-level length scaling exponent varied from 0.04 to 0.11 and the calculated branch-level radii scaling exponent ranged from 0.30 to 0.32 (Table 1). The calculated (estimated) metabolic rate scaling exponent was 0.72, 0.71 and 0.76 for Tachigali polyphylla, Jacaranda copaia and Sclerolobium bracteosum (expected to be 0.75 from the WBE model). Estimations of tree scaling metabolism derived from architecture via TLS scans showed consistent and comparable values to the model predictions for all scaling exponents. Since the scanned trees were different species, these results provide evidence to support the WBE assumption of similarities in branching structure and common set of branching rules across trees. To conclude, tree scaling metabolism derived from TLS evidenced that (1) length ratio exponent, radii ratio exponent and architecture estimated metabolic rate converge between the tropical trees analysed, and (2) length ratio exponent, radii ratio exponent and estimated metabolic rate from the analysed samples are comparable with the predicted values.

UR - http://lps16.esa.int/page_session187.php#1134p

M3 - Paper, poster or abstract

ER -