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The validity of using non-representative users in gaze communication research

Tutkimustuotosvertaisarvioitu

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The validity of using non-representative users in gaze communication research. / Istance, Howell; Vickers, Stephen; Hyrskykari, Aulikki.

Proceedings - ETRA 2012: Eye Tracking Research and Applications Symposium. 2012. s. 233-236.

Tutkimustuotosvertaisarvioitu

Harvard

Istance, H, Vickers, S & Hyrskykari, A 2012, The validity of using non-representative users in gaze communication research. julkaisussa Proceedings - ETRA 2012: Eye Tracking Research and Applications Symposium. Sivut 233-236, Santa Barbara, CA, Yhdysvallat, 28/03/12. https://doi.org/10.1145/2168556.2168603

APA

Istance, H., Vickers, S., & Hyrskykari, A. (2012). The validity of using non-representative users in gaze communication research. teoksessa Proceedings - ETRA 2012: Eye Tracking Research and Applications Symposium (Sivut 233-236) https://doi.org/10.1145/2168556.2168603

Vancouver

Istance H, Vickers S, Hyrskykari A. The validity of using non-representative users in gaze communication research. julkaisussa Proceedings - ETRA 2012: Eye Tracking Research and Applications Symposium. 2012. s. 233-236 https://doi.org/10.1145/2168556.2168603

Author

Istance, Howell ; Vickers, Stephen ; Hyrskykari, Aulikki. / The validity of using non-representative users in gaze communication research. Proceedings - ETRA 2012: Eye Tracking Research and Applications Symposium. 2012. Sivut 233-236

Bibtex - Lataa

@inproceedings{e6b08ad551d14b43a5d8d7552bdf4f3d,
title = "The validity of using non-representative users in gaze communication research",
abstract = "Gaze-based interaction techniques have been investigated for the last two decades, and in many cases the evaluation of these has been based on trials with able-bodied users and conventional usability criteria, mainly speed and accuracy. The target user group of many of the gaze-based techniques investigated is, however, people with different types of physical disabilities. We present the outcomes of two studies that compare the performance of two groups of participants with a type of physical disability (one being cerebral palsy and the other muscular dystrophy) with that of a control group of able-bodied participants doing a task using a particular gaze interaction technique. One study used a task based on dwell-time selection, and the other used a task based on gaze gestures. In both studies, the groups of participants with physical disabilities performed significantly worse than the able-bodied control participants. We question the ecological validity of research into gaze interaction intended for people with physical disabilities that only uses able-bodied participants in evaluation studies without any testing using members of the target user population.",
keywords = "assistive input devices, eye tracking, gaze communication, physically disabled user groups, representative users",
author = "Howell Istance and Stephen Vickers and Aulikki Hyrskykari",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1145/2168556.2168603",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781450312257",
pages = "233--236",
booktitle = "Proceedings - ETRA 2012: Eye Tracking Research and Applications Symposium",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Lataa

TY - GEN

T1 - The validity of using non-representative users in gaze communication research

AU - Istance, Howell

AU - Vickers, Stephen

AU - Hyrskykari, Aulikki

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Gaze-based interaction techniques have been investigated for the last two decades, and in many cases the evaluation of these has been based on trials with able-bodied users and conventional usability criteria, mainly speed and accuracy. The target user group of many of the gaze-based techniques investigated is, however, people with different types of physical disabilities. We present the outcomes of two studies that compare the performance of two groups of participants with a type of physical disability (one being cerebral palsy and the other muscular dystrophy) with that of a control group of able-bodied participants doing a task using a particular gaze interaction technique. One study used a task based on dwell-time selection, and the other used a task based on gaze gestures. In both studies, the groups of participants with physical disabilities performed significantly worse than the able-bodied control participants. We question the ecological validity of research into gaze interaction intended for people with physical disabilities that only uses able-bodied participants in evaluation studies without any testing using members of the target user population.

AB - Gaze-based interaction techniques have been investigated for the last two decades, and in many cases the evaluation of these has been based on trials with able-bodied users and conventional usability criteria, mainly speed and accuracy. The target user group of many of the gaze-based techniques investigated is, however, people with different types of physical disabilities. We present the outcomes of two studies that compare the performance of two groups of participants with a type of physical disability (one being cerebral palsy and the other muscular dystrophy) with that of a control group of able-bodied participants doing a task using a particular gaze interaction technique. One study used a task based on dwell-time selection, and the other used a task based on gaze gestures. In both studies, the groups of participants with physical disabilities performed significantly worse than the able-bodied control participants. We question the ecological validity of research into gaze interaction intended for people with physical disabilities that only uses able-bodied participants in evaluation studies without any testing using members of the target user population.

KW - assistive input devices

KW - eye tracking

KW - gaze communication

KW - physically disabled user groups

KW - representative users

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84862702657&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1145/2168556.2168603

DO - 10.1145/2168556.2168603

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781450312257

SP - 233

EP - 236

BT - Proceedings - ETRA 2012: Eye Tracking Research and Applications Symposium

ER -